Breathing Room Week 4: Undisciplined Pursuit of More

September 28, 2019

Dear brothers and sisters,

 

            During this series, we’ve been talking about how life is a little better when we have breathing room.  God has no limits, but we do.  When we don’t have breathing room, we become very self-centered and self-focused.  Our culture constantly pushes us to our limits, and we constantly have to fight for breathing room.  That’s what we are trying to learn during the course of this series.  We talked about counting the cost; coming back to Our Father when we are overburdened; living beneath our means with our finances; and today we are looking at a “heart” issue.  We look at 1 Kings 3, the story of King Solomon, son of David, who at first asks God not for wealth and power, but for wisdom.  God then grants him wisdom, peace, and success beyond his dreams.  However, over time, little by little, his power and riches corrupted him, and he kept desiring more.  In 1 Kings 11, we hear about how this “pursuit of more” ultimately corrupted his heart: his heart was not entirely with the LORD, his God (1 Kings 11:4).  It’s not wrong to want to grow, or make more money, or see our kids succeed.  None of these are wrong in themselves, but when we become undisciplined, we can lose sight of our core values, and we forget our limits.  It’s so easy for us to let many things in life push us to the limit.  Without discipline, we can unknowing let certain things gradually fill up our lives – maybe it’s taking on extra work projects, or extra activities with family, or certain hobbies.  Like Solomon, these things can gradually push out our relationship with God.  On the other hand, if we remain vigilant and fight for breathing room, letting God be rule our hearts, this will not happen.  Questions for Small Groups: 

  1. Last week, we discussed financial breathing room.  Did you have an opportunity to make any changes as a result of last week’s discussion? 

  2. Read aloud 1 Kings 11:3-4.  What is the excess that brought down Solomon?  What thoughts do you have about his story? 

  3. Why is “more” so attractive to us?  How does it drive breathing room out of our lives?

  4. What is the “more” you find yourself pursuing in an undisciplined way?  What would it look like for you to bring discipline to that part of your life? 

  5. What is in your heart that makes you pursue “more?”  What need are you trying to fill? 

  6. Is there something you just need to say “no more” to right now? 

With blessings,

 

Fr. Reichlen

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Please reload

Featured Posts

I'm busy working on my blog posts. Watch this space!

Please reload

Recent Posts
Please reload

Archive